The 14th Amendment is up for Debate? Seriously?

There is a lot of noise coming out of Washington this week that we need to re-examine the 14th Amendment to the US Constitution.  What?  Excuse me?  I shook my head when I read these headlines, not seeing where this could possibly be coming from.

Let's look at what the 14th Amendment says (Section 1 being the most sweeping):

Section 1. All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

Click here for Sections 2,  3, 4, and 5

And a bit of historical background for context courtesy of wikipedia:

[The 14th Amendment] represented the Congress's overruling of the Dred Scott decision to the extent that decision held black people were not, and could not become, citizens of the United States or enjoy any of the privileges and immunities of citizenship.[1] The Civil Rights Act of 1866 had already granted U.S. citizenship to all persons born in the United States; the framers of the Fourteenth Amendment added this principle into the Constitution to prevent the Supreme Court from ruling the Civil Rights Act of 1866 to be unconstitutional for lack of congressional authority to enact such a law or a future Congress from altering it by a mere majority vote.

More importantly, the 14th Amendment contains the equal protection clause that prohibits the government from treating people differently based on race, religion, gender, disability, etc. and is the fundamental constitutional support for the promise set forth in the Declaration of Independence that "all men are created equal".  Among others, the 14th Amendment was the basis to end segregation, and the underpinnings of granting women the right to vote.

So I see today that 14th Amendment of all things is trending on Yahoo and Google and go to an article.  "Whither the 14th Amendment?" at the Washington Post explains that:  

Chalk it up perhaps to election-year bizarreness, but suddenly the capital is debating whether the 14th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution ought to be repealed, refined or left alone.

Specifically, the back-and-forth, which started among Senate Republicans and was joined Tuesday by the White House, focuses on the amendment's citizenship clause.

A pair of Republican senators -- Jon Kyl of Arizona and Lindsey Graham of South Carolina -- are not so sure the amendment's intent was to grant automatic citizenship to children born in the United States to parents here illegally.

Ok - In 1866, when passed, where do you think the additions to the US population were coming from?  The answer, immigration.  Regardless of where you stand on the debate, lets adhere to some historical accuracy.  In the 1850's and 60's, immigrants represented between 5 and 6% of the US population. Today it is more like 1%.  (US Immigration as Percent of Population1820 - 2004) .

Politico reports that "Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) on Tuesday night argued that the 14th Amendment no longer serves the purpose it was designed to address and that Congress should reexamine granting citizenship to any child born in the United States."

I find it ironic that the issue of a constitutional amendment becoming "historic" in that it  no longer serves its purpose, given that such an argument echoes the 2nd amendment reformers have been saying for year.

Lets skip the rhetoric and focus all this time and energy on solving a real problem, not creating a red herring of sound-bites without providing a fair context for digestion.

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